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5 Leadership Types – What Type Of Leader Are You?

By Business Management Coaching Leadership No Comments

Being a great leader can be challenging. Nobody is born with some miraculous gene that grants them the ability to lead and also be effective at it. To be a leader means that you need to have attributes like patience, curiosity, interest and determination, so that you’re able to create a positive impact on those that you lead towards a collective goal.

But there are many different types of leaders.

Some are more aggressive than others, some more understanding and open-minded, some are strict and some are lenient; but they all have one thing in common: the ability to foster action and mobility while creating an impact on the lives of others.

While I deal with so many different personalities and leadership styles as a business coach, I’ve come to learn that being aware of each person’s approach to leadership is extremely important in developing and strengthening their business, as well as their people.

So, I’ve done a bit of research and listed the top leadership types that exist so that you, as the business owner, can find those that you resonate with in order to develop and enhance your approach to leadership. Let’s dive right in.

 

5 – The Autocrat

The autocratic leader is usually authoritarian in nature. While they’re a bit more aggressive, they tend to delegate the tasks and jobs that need to be done, so that workers listen and do as they’re told.

This style of leadership works well because it saves time and provides much-needed clarity around objectives, goals and outcomes. There are also fewer errors in strategy implementation, as less people are involved in the strategic process – which often brings about much better results.

However, the down-side to this style of leadership is that employees feel undervalued and easily replaceable. It leaves them less motivated and far more likely to rebel against either the leader or the company, which usually results in lower levels of productivity and morale, and increased levels of office politics and infighting.

Using this approach in high-risk environments can be quite effective, as there is usually no room for errors or mistakes to be made. However, it usually fails in educational and creative environments, where people need a lot more freedom and independence to give good ideas and feel heard.

 

4 – The Democrat

This approach to leadership is significantly different to that of the autocratic leader. They make sure to involve team-members in the decision-making process and give them the opportunity to voice their thoughts and opinions. Most of the time, this type of leader has the final say, but values and embraces the input from employees and the team as a whole.

The only problem with it is that it can be quite time-consuming to take in every individual’s ideas and thoughts which can often lead to poor choices if the team or its members are inexperienced or unskilled in any way.

With this approach, the upside is that there is far more motivation from employees, as they feel valued and respected. It allows for the accumulation of different perspectives and approaches, rather than relying on one person to provide his/her viewpoint.

It works really well for those smaller teams or any team that has highly skilled and experienced members which can bring value to the decision-making.

 

3 – The “Let Them Do” Leader (Laissez-Faire) 

The complete opposite of the autocratic leader. This approach doesn’t usually fulfil the typical role of a leader, as everyone’s input is deemed valid and equal. Ultimately, they leave the decision-making up to their team members, giving teams complete trust in their abilities to motivate themselves and navigate the business effectively.

While this style seems quite favourable, it often leads to confusion, delays and slow-progress – especially in strategic planning. It also hampers individual development, as people become reliant on their own ideas and thoughts, rarely looking to improve themselves.

However, this approach can be great in that it helps team members feel valued, heard and appreciated. It empowers employees and leaves them with a greater sense of confidence and autonomy, as they feel capable of handling the work on their own without being pressured and undermined.

This approach works very well in teams with highly-skilled individuals that usually have the expertise to make valuable contributions (similar to the democratic approach). Each member is able to take the lead and has great trust in one another to make proper, productive and effective choices that add value to the company.

 

2 – The Incentiviser (Transactional Leader) 

These are the types of leaders that make use of effective reward and punishment systems in order to promote self-motivation and the ambition to succeed. By using incentives to drive employees, these leaders have a fixed and functioning system that says to work hard or receive no benefits.

One of the biggest issues with this approach is that the environment is usually quite strict in structure and rather inflexible. There’s often little room for different viewpoints or processes and can lead to people feeling undervalued, as they’re only there to follow the lead. Employees usually feel restricted in making an impact and everybody has the same measurement of achievement – those who sell or produce more, get more.

However, the upside is that goals and outcomes are clearly defined and can easily be understood by teams and individual employees. The incentives and consequences are also made crystal clear and it’s up to the individual to do a great job – so it also instills a sense of confidence and accountability in the employee regarding their expectations.

 

1 – The Transformer (Transformational Leader)

This approach to leadership puts more focus on the leader’s personality and the way in which they motivate employees to constantly innovate and improve. They are often guided by a clear vision of success and ensure that everybody is focused on the company’s mission and purpose. These leaders aim to inspire and create a positive work culture for everyone involved, acting as a role-model and exemplar.

One of the biggest issues with this style of leadership is that it makes way for a culture of sycophants that aim to please the leader at any given opportunity. Employees can become more focused on getting their leader’s approval, instead of focusing on performance, productivity and team support.

This approach works well, because leaders act as role-models to staff, inspiring them and motivating them to achieve greatness not only for the company, but for themselves. There’s usually a high focus on the vision of the company and what it will take to become more valuable in the long-run. These leaders value interpersonal relationships and are engaging in the way that they communicate with staff, leaving lasting impressions and a stronger sense of camaraderie.

 

What Type Of Leader Do You Want To Be? 

While there are these different approaches to being an effective and impressionable leader, it’s up to you to pick and choose. Weigh out the different options, see which of them suit your personality more and learn, learn, learn.

By taking the time to educate yourself on your favourite approaches, you’re able to decide which one(s) will be more advantageous to you and your business.

Perhaps you like two, or even three of them and want to make a cocktail that includes the best points into one powerful hybrid approach that suits you better – then by all means, do so. Being a unique individual means finding unique and remarkable ways to do things.

If you find that you’re already comfortable with your approach, but need advice, mentoring, guidance or more perspective, then I’m the right coach for you.

Even if you’re still trying to figure out what leader you want to be, I can help you make the right decision for you and your business.

I’ve worked with so many different clients that I’ve helped develop and grow – engaging with many different leaders and personalities that attract high levels of success, so I know exactly what to look for and inspire in you.

 

Get in touch today. Tell me about your business, your dreams, goals and ambitions. Let me help make the difference that you seek.

+2783 253 3339

brent@spillly.com

 

Become Like A Chef – Share Your Secret Recipe!

By Business Coaching Creative Motivation No Comments

What is it that makes so many great chefs, well, great? Some would say it’s in their ability to take some of the simplest ingredients and make something surprisingly delicious out of it, or to bring novelty to the kitchen, introducing insane dishes and combinations nobody would have thought to invent.

Some of the greatest chefs known to man like Gordon Ramsay, Jamie Oliver and Nigella (to name a few) all have one thing in common: they refuse to keep their genius a secret.

You could say that it’s somewhat outdated (and deluded) to be holding onto a secret recipe that would be kept and carried to the grave, only to be experienced by the innovator and those they deem worthy of indulging in their beautiful offerings.

Not in this day and age.

 

The True Secret is To Share

What you’ll find is that these culinary architects refuse to keep their ideas all to themselves and instead opt to share their incredible creations with the rest of the world and through whichever medium they so choose.

With a simple Google search, you can find pretty much any recipe that a world-renowned chef has ever put out there to be gobbled up by the masses.

Too lazy to read it? Well, you could probably even find them on Youtube and watch the entire process with all the direction and guidance you’ll need.

The bottom-line is this: these chefs know that they are amazing at what they do. They thoroughly understand the science behind the food and that they can, and will, do the job better than anyone else that would attempt it.

So sharing their secret recipes and even going as far as to putting the directions on display is of little detriment to what they are capable of offering.

 

Your IP Is Like Expensive Jewellery 

What would be the point in having the most gorgeous watch, or the most stunning necklace that you know people would be completely enamoured by, but always keep it hidden away in a jewellery box, afraid of it being damaged or stolen?

It’s of no real use if it isn’t shared with the world.

I have clients that tell me that they have such superb, or ground-breaking ideas, but are too afraid to show the world; in fear of their idea being stolen and copied, or worse, made into something better.

Your IP, or Intellectual Property, could be worth millions, could change lives and could launch you into stardom, but without wielding it and displaying to the world how powerful it is, you’re not doing yourself any favours. Keeping it a secret means that you are not acting on it and that in itself is a travesty.

Imagine King Arthur drew Excalibur from the stone, wrapped it up and hid it under his bed, for it to never see the light of day, again. Fearing that someone might steal it, or make a clone.

That fear will be a massive hindrance to your growth potential.

The great Zig Ziglar once came up with a fantastic acronym for fear. You can approach fear in one of two ways; you can either “Forget Everything and Run”, or “Face Everything and Rise.”

By facing your fear, you take on the promise of having your idea spread and heard by people. Those people will give credit where credit is due, especially if you are open to sharing your ideas and strategies with the world. This selfless approach is a catalyst to selfish results, if that makes sense.

Use that precious, luxurious IP of yours and wear it for the world to see. Don’t keep it hidden in your box of precious belongings, or nobody knows that it even exists.

 

Spread Your IP Like a Virus 

I’ve made reference to Seth Godin’s Ideavirus, before and will reiterate it here once again.

You need to look at your ideas as if they should be a contagious virus, to ultimately become viral; an infection that spreads to as many people as possible.

Your product, brand, or idea should spark and ignite a pandemic that has as many people know about it. It should spread like a sneeze and keep spreading until everybody is a carrier.

The same can be said about what those great chefs do. They spread their recipes and tricks like a virus to hook as many people as possible. Fully aware that they are amazing at what they do, they aren’t afraid to share their ideas for free or for a bit of money.

In the end, they win.

 

So Be As Contagious As An Infected Chef 

Your IP is only as good as the amount of people that are infected with it, to share it and spread it.

Don’t be afraid of sharing your tricks, your ideas, your business and brand with the world. Share the secret recipes that you’re keeping locked up in a safe, wear your ideas like fine jewellery and sneeze that shit all over the place like it’s Covid.

I’m basically terminal – giving away all of the advice and secrets to my success, even though it’s my bread and butter.

I know how valuable I am to my clients, to business owners and entrepreneurs and I’m more than confident in my ability to coach like Tony Robbins. I have no problem sharing.

So when you’re ready to be infected, like a zombie with an insatiable hunger for the world – hit me up.

I’d be more than glad to share my years of experience and knowledge with you. Let’s get together and not wear our masks; come and get infected with me.

Cough up a call sometime, my number is +2783 253 3339

Or sneeze an email in my direction on brent@spillly.com

I’m looking forward to hearing from you!

Scarcity VS Abundance Mindset

By Business Coaching Motivation psychology No Comments

As a business owner, you don’t only carry the responsibility of running your own company; you often assume the role of a leader that has to bring direction, guidance and ambition to others in order to build a successful business.

You act as a role-model to staff. You influence those around you. You create impressions that last.

That’s why it’s so important to be aware of the mindset that you carry, as you come to affect not only those around you, but your own behaviour, as well.

Indeed, constraints and obstacles will have an effect on your vision and can become a nuisance to accomplishing your goals, however, your perception will ultimately shape your reality and determine whether you fail or succeed as an entrepreneur.

Why Mindset Matters

 I’ve coached many business owners over the years and while personalities certainly differ, a common theme that I’ve come across is that of the two mindsets that people have: The scarcity mindset and the abundance mindset.

There’s always a problem or obstacle to face when running a business – unfortunately, it comes with the package. Being an entrepreneur is hard-work and nobody said it would be easy, but the way that some business owners go about solving particular problems can be ineffective, to say the least, and that’s often due to the limiting beliefs that come with having a negative mindset.

Based on the way that they approach a problem, there’s a level of pessimism and cynicism that ends up blinding their thoughts and governing their decisions.

Although we’ve become somewhat desensitized to those terms, being the pessimist or the cynic is a very dangerous path to choose. It doesn’t only have a negative impact on yourself, but bleeds through to others and can be harmful to business and personal relations.So much research has been done to prove how powerful the human mind is and how our mindset, philosophy and thought-processes can affect the behaviours and the decisions that we make.

It’s important to understand that we’re not like magnets; positive doesn’t attract negative and negative doesn’t attract positive. It’s quite the opposite, actually. If you remain positive in your approach, you’re far more likely to attract positive outcomes – the same applies with being negative and attracting negative outcomes.

Call it the law of attraction, a self-fulfilling prophecy or whatever you choose; at the end of the day, we are affected by what we think and the mindset that we carry with us on a daily basis.

Mindset matters. It shapes our interactions and achievements. It shapes the world that we live in.

 The 4 Constraints In Business That Affect Our Mindset

 With certain clients that I coach, I often come to recognise a mindset of scarcity and take the time to figure out the best way to understand where they’re coming from, so that I can help provide a solution to their problem.

Whether it’s a matter of strategic thinking, or day-to-day problem solving, they start from a negative standpoint, saying, “we can’t do that, because…”.

Often, the “because” is due to certain constraints.

“We can’t do that, because we don’t have the people, or enough people, or the skills in our people; we don’t have enough money to afford solving the problem; we don’t have the time to tackle these issues.”

The four biggest constraints are always around resources (lack of technology, skills, etc), people, time, and money.

These constraints can be problematic, but there’s always a solution to be found. So when I coach clients that deal with these issues, I start by recommending that they forget about those four constraints.

The Magic Wand

I like to use the hypothetical scenario of a magic wand that could wipe away all of those constraints with immediate effect and ask them what they would choose to do in their business and how they would go about it.

This usually brings about different thinking and solutions that they were previously unable to imagine.

It shifts the perspective from “how do we solve that thing?” to “how do we raise the money or find the right people to do that thing?”; creating a segue that changes their stance from reactive to proactive.

This brings about new ideas and changes the approach from scarcity to one more focused on the abundance that comes with solving the initial problem.

What I tend to find during this process is that there is no real shortage of solutions to the problem they’re facing, but rather that solutions were needed around those constraints. In my experience, solving the constraints opened the door to solving the initial problem.

This approach is based around an abundance mindset – one that seeks solutions through positive thinking. It motivates and allows you to think about problems differently and find answers from a different perspective.

Adopting An Approach To Abundance

 By adopting a mindset based on abundance, you begin to change your idea of life and business, as a whole. You see the advantages within the disadvantages and constraints; you find a silver-lining in everything that you approach.

It works itself into the way that you handle, influence and work with people. You’re seen as more positive and uplifting, rather than an emotional wreck that harbours problems and struggles to find solutions.

It prevents you from playing the blame game and invites you to take responsibility and accountability.

Scarcity acts like a leech on your thought processes and behaviour, while abundance acts as a catalyst to being a better, more productive individual. Again, we’re not like magnets in the sense that opposites attract; like attracts like, love attracts love, good attracts good.

Try it for yourself. Do the research.

And if you struggle, then fake it until you make it.

Struggling to find that silver-lining? Struggling to pick off all of the leeches that drain the optimism out of you? Worry not. I’m here to assist.

If it’s becoming so bad that it has an impact on your business, then get in touch with me and let’s discuss how I can help you move forward. I’ll bring all of the abundance you so desperately need and who knows, my cheerful attitude might just rub off on you – shifting your gear from scarcity to abundance.

Call me, Whatsapp me, contact me, today:

+2783 253 3339

brent@spillly.com

Practice What You Preach And Become Your Own Best Client

By Business Coaching Entrepreneur Motivation No Comments

When dissecting this proverb, “the cobbler’s children have no shoes”, it can be understood as a phrase that describes a person who doesn’t benefit from the products or services of their own profession and as far back as this saying goes, it remains clear how relevant it is in business today.

In my experience with coaching, I’ve come to find that the lack of internal use of services or products that a business provides is a common occurrence within plenty of industries, whether it’s a law firm, advertising agency, or media company – implementing their own solutions seems to be out of the equation.

I don’t quite agree with that logic, as every company should be their own number one client and make practical use of the services (and products) that they provide.

Salaries Are Paid, So Provide The Service To Yourself

 Indeed, it does take time, resources and plenty of effort to provide a great solution to different clients. And as a business owner, you make sure to put your best effort in when giving people the greatest possible value that you have to offer.

But, the same logic should be applied when looking at your company; clients will come and go, leaving the most consistent and important client being your own organisation.

For some strange reason, too many entrepreneurs feel as if they should outsource or pay for external involvement to solve some of the problems that they are perfectly capable of handling within their own company.

I find it quite a common occurrence in ad agencies, where they often look past their own employees to advertise and market their business by looking elsewhere – wasting energy and resources on other people to do the job. The very same thing happens in particular law firms, where legal issues are handled externally, instead of looking at their own highly qualified and capable staff to get certain jobs done.In doing the research and going through a number of case studies, I’ve come to find that some of the most successful companies that exist make use of their own services internally and take this approach quite seriously; often spending up to 20% of their total budget around providing homegrown solutions to themselves.

This becomes even easier (and obvious) to do when staff are already being paid salaries to provide these solutions for other clients.

When you boil it down, it’s simply a case of practicing what you preach. You should put your own services into practice and utilise them to advance your business, while avoiding unnecessary spending.

It becomes a bit counterproductive to spend time and money hunting down external sources to do things that your company is already highly capable of doing on its own. Every business owner should be aware of this when seeking out solutions for their organisation.

You’re technically paying for the service already, so make your own company a client and treat that client with love, respect and attention.

 

More Benefits To Becoming Your Own Best Customer

 Making efficient use of the solutions that you provide within your own business is obviously very useful and will be of great benefit, so it goes without saying that running with the idea of being your own client or customer can bring about even more promising results.

Taking the time to act as a client for your own company will give you more insight into the way that it operates.

You go from actively seeking clients to becoming one – looking at your business from a different perspective. And by using your own products or services, it will help you pick up on issues, flaws and points that could be worked on to build a better brand identity.

This brings awareness around processes or interactions that could be made better for your customers, improving delivery in different departments and discovering areas where money, time and resources can be saved.

Becoming your own customer or client allows for more involvement and understanding, which will aid you in developing a much better solution.

Give it a try, be more involved, practice what you preach and make a far greater impact.

As a business coach, I’m constantly practicing what I preach and have to ensure that it’s my duty to deliver an impactful, remarkable and informative solution to my clients.

It isn’t easy running a business, it isn’t easy being alone at the top, it isn’t easy figuring out the right direction to take when the going gets tough, but it is easy to connect with a coach that has the ambition, drive and desire to make a difference in your life.

I am that coach and I am eager to take the journey with you in becoming the best version of yourself, so that your business will flourish.

Make life easier by contacting me whenever you’re ready:

+2783 253 3339

brent@spillly.com

Performance, Culture And Taking On The Terrorists

By Coaching Culture Interviews No Comments

Seeking a high-performance culture, with the highest output is often a top priority in many businesses and the same probably goes for yours.

The stronger and more competent the staff prove themselves to be, ultimately become solid indicators of who you want working for you and contributing to the success of your business.

Who doesn’t like a hard-worker, especially one that produces results at an incredible rate?

In providing my clients with a high-performance culture that has hard-working staff, I make sure to tie-in a soft, nurturing culture that is inviting to the employees; which should be on the top of any business-owner’s priority list.

 

Culture And Performance Matrix 

Most business-owners want to attract high-performance, high-output staff; with fewer people on their pay-roll and that work much harder at building the company, as opposed to having a shit-load of employees where output and performance varies.

In choosing a healthy balance, though, the culture that exists within the business is just as important as the measured performance thereof.

If you ran a business that only had an environment of high-performers, there would be heightened levels of boredom and a looming disinterest in the company and the people running it. So, in combining a nurturing culture that caters to employee relationships and building strong teams with varying levels of comfort would be just as important to the momentum of a healthy operation.

In the following matrix that I provide for my clients, I divide the staff into four different quadrants that look at their different levels of competency, as well as the involvement of company culture. I make sure to put emphasis on the star employees that make the most significant contribution to your business.

On the top right quadrant of the matrix, your best performers and most productive staff members are seated within an appropriate environment of culture and performance. These are the people you should throw money at, they are the future leaders of the company and your best employees. Your goal is to move as many staff into that quadrant.

Conversely, the bottom left quadrant indicates the staff or employees with the minimum performance potential and very low levels of culture; these staff are easily recognisable and have a low productive output, which are better to try and get rid of. They ultimately impede on the performance of the business and can end up driving you mad. In other words, these people must go.

In the bottom right, you’ll find quadrant three, which has what I call the terrorists of the business. They are a great culture fit and are very well-received by the rest of the staff, but are low-output performers. These tend to be the riskiest staff members to have, as they are engaging, humorous and build a strong rapport with the rest of the employees, but, more often than not, motivate other employees to adopt their lackadaisical approach.

Due to their lack of performance, they are often a good target to get rid of, however they affect the rest of the staff in such a way that you’ll be questioned or have to deal with unpleasant rebuttals, as they leave good impressions on the rest of the staff. Complete terrorists, I tell you.

The quadrant to the top left are where your most malleable staff sit; those that have high potential and should be massaged into the right company culture – making them suitable candidates for the first quadrant of high-performing, high-output staff. Love and nurture these employees, find what motivates them and push them toward the first quadrant.

 

High-Output And Strong-Culture Staff Are The Most Suitable Candidates 

A wonderful way to approach this is in the way Jim Collins does with the best of his employees, “we hire five, work them like ten and pay them like eight.”

In using my method and honing in on the right attributes to look for in the staff, you should make a habit of reviewing where it is that your employees sit, especially when doing KPIs or performance reviews.

Cycle through the different categories of employees so that as many of them can reach the level of your most optimal performers, those with a strong culture and high-output. Try to get rid of the terrorists and the poorest performers, while finding the right methods to motivate the best of your employees.

Plot out which employees sit in which quadrant of your business and try to ensure they are a good culture fit and not just high-performing. Ask yourself if they are a right match for your vision.

This is a new way of looking at your staff and you should constantly reflect on the quality of your employees at any given time. I make sure to always apply this tactic as a business coach when working with my clients, as they often struggle with team cohesion and analysis.

 

If this makes sense to you, If it resonates with you, And if you need help to achieve such a cohesive and high-output environment:

 

I’m the right business coach for you.

Hit me up, grab me for a quick cup of coffee, a Zoom meeting, use me and abuse me, I’m a call or email away:

+2783 253 3339

brent@spillly.com

Change Quotient – Better than IQ and EQ?

By Coaching Motivation psychology No Comments

Finding comfort, stability and security are amongst our top priorities as human-beings; we seek to find solace in being as lazy as possible, sitting flat on our asses until our legs go numb.

Some of the most intelligent people on this Earth choose to sniff out the easiest possible route to take in life to get rich as soon as humanly possible. That’s why you might find some of the top-tier criminals have some of the highest IQs.

Unfortunately, a high IQ doesn’t always translate to wise decision-making.

Then there are those with extreme levels of empathy, leaning toward the wrong-end of the spectrum of EQ. Tell me something, is it a form of Emotional Intelligence to be so wound-up about something – anything – exuberating such intense levels of empathy that it translates to high-level cringe? Think extremist vegans; feminazis; simps and the like.

Too much emotion can have you crying and even throwing earth-trembling tantrums for the most irrelevant horseshit.

It goes without saying that a healthy combination of intelligence and empathy can go a long way – as a leader, an employee, a business owner… a serial killer.

But without the ability to adapt to change, they don’t hold as much weight.

 Darwin showed us just how powerful natural selection is – the innate ability to adapt to changing environments and circumstances; inevitably resulting in longevity.

Stupid dinosaurs. They couldn’t even outlive roaches.

Even roaches, crocs (not those despicable shoes) and lobsters all stood the test of time, leaving the dinosaurs but a memory forever bound to history books. What a shame.

What a shame it would be if the top of the food chain – i.e. humans – were to act so weak and powerless. Our innate ability to adapt to changing circumstances makes us amazing, capable and with the potential to evolve faster than anything else on this Earth.

In the workplace, in business, in running the world, our consistent battle with adversity is one that makes us better, stronger and far more capable then any of our quadrupedal counterparts.

As humans, we are constantly faced with hurdles and challenges that test our mettle, that push us far beyond the boundaries of excellence and history has proven this to us time and time again.

Adapting to change is etched into our genetic makeup and psyche, it’s so natural and yet we scoff at anything that rocks our boat, anything that brings about a change in flow and direction.

CQ Is the New Black

Our Change Quotient (CQ) is becoming quite trendy and a far more popular indicator of how capable people are in their work environment – whether running a business, leading a team, or being the best employee.

Being able to adapt and change when adversity rears its ugly head is becoming just as important as one’s IQ or EQ and is a powerful determining factor in our capabilities as humans.

With the Covid pandemic pillaging and destroying businesses, jobs and lives, we’re left to see the determination and power in those that are able to navigate the unpredictable storm.

This burgeoning storm, like many others, has brought about immense change in some of the best ways possible; new ways of doing business, new technologies, new competition, new roles, new services and products.It seems like we only enjoy change when it suits us; which should be all the time.

Don’t get me wrong, it’s not about changing completely and having to forage for a new identity from the abyss, but we should constantly strive to evolve and grow, especially in times of adversity or extreme change.

Like a tadpole taking on new features and form, becoming something bigger and stronger without losing its identity, its DNA. Or a caterpillar adapting and taking on a newer, more powerful design, one that can take on far more challenges with poise and agility.

Your ability to change is a profound gateway to more possibilities and opportunities.

3 C’s of Change

 I’ve come to find that there are three different factors that bring about change. These three factors force you to evolve, or be left behind and eaten – gobbled up like a McD’s burger in a fat kid’s lunchbox.

Two of the three factors that play a big role in our ability to make provisions for adaptation shouldn’t be the only reasons to propel us forward in life, as they force sudden change:

Circumstance forces you to take a look at yourself, your position and make quick decisions that will have you adapt and survive. Covid, as an example, has forced us to deal with circumstances we were too relaxed to pay attention to. Only when the shit hits the fan, do we take a look in the mirror and say, “it’s time for a change”.

Don’t wait for a circumstance to creep up and swallow you whole.

Crisis demands that you pull up your socks and get the ball rolling with haste, or die. We hate it when it barges in, but neglect to acknowledge that it is a reality that needs to be addressed and planned for. When you’re struck with absolutely no choice, left wondering “why am I here and how did this happen?”, you’ve been battered by crisis and often find it’s too late to gather your things and run.

Everything gets swept up into the maelstrom and you’re left with no option, but to change.

Don’t wait for a crisis and be shocked when it does come kick your door down.

And finally,

Choice is the factor that we should all strive to undertake. Like the tadpole, or the caterpillar, we should seek and choose to evolve and adapt toward a bigger, better form. We need to make the decision, the choice to bring about change and always be prepared for uncertainty. Be eager to adapt and avoid reliance on comfort.

We all have free-will, so by exercising your ability to change and by showing readiness to adapt, you will find that great benefit and strength in adversity become your new norm.

Do you want to go beyond extinction, still alive and well, way past your due date?

Well then, I have just the thing for you…

… My number and my Email address.

It will take a little bit more than just reading this to prepare yourself.

You need someone that will get you armed to the teeth and ready for war,

Ready to take on the next massive shift:

Find change, before it finds you.

+2783 253 3339

brent@spillly.com

..or just follow my mind as it dumps value all over the interwebs… @Spillly with three Ls everywhere; Twitter, Instagram, Facebook..

 

 

 

Seeking Out Talent And Culture In Hiring New Staff

By Business Coaching Interviews Motivation No Comments

In most businesses you’ll find a lot of emphasis put on skills and experience during the hiring process and in selecting the most ideal candidate to employ.

As a coach that works closely with business owners and entrepreneurs, I always recommend that my clients widen their scope a little bit more and pay attention to a few important aspects to consider when employing new people into their businesses.

We know that skills and experience are tried and tested – it gets the job done and gets the position filled – but, it isn’t enough to find employees that can really make a true impact.

 

Talent, Culture And A Paradigm Shift 

If you’re building a business that requires people, which most businesses do, one of the most important processes will be your ability to find and hire quality people and retain them for a long time.

It’s certainly a crucial part of running a business, but what tends to happen is that most businesses will only interview for both skills and experience – which, we can all agree, is a bit outdated.

Skills refer to what the person studied, learned and whether or not they can do what it takes to produce results in their field; while experience refers to what jobs they’ve had, how long they’ve been in the workforce, which businesses they’ve worked for and what they’ve been exposed to in those environments.

It’s easy to measure these two attributes, as you can check who they’ve worked for and the duration; you can take a look at their body of work to get a sense of what they’re able to produce; and you can check their character through references.

But what often tends to happen is that when these people join the business, there comes a realisation that they’re not a good fit, culturally speaking and that they don’t have the right talent often required by the business. Talents can be considered one’s ability to do things naturally, their ability to learn and ability to take and adapt to criticism.

These attributes need to be paid far more attention when choosing the right staff and during the hiring process to get the best out of the people that help operate the business.

 

Incorporating Value Into Your Business Through It’s People 

The first step that needs to be taken is to identify what your business culture is and what your company values are and being aware of this will allow you to have a stronger sense of the people you require to complement your business.

In the second step and during the interview process, you need to figure out how to test the culture and value that the person can bring to your business – figuring out whether they’re a great fit and that the candidate and company will comfortably dovetail; you need to ensure that you’re inclusive of both talent and culture.

I’m not saying that you should discard the current factors that are looked for in potential employees, but to pay more attention to attributes that might bring extra added value to your business. Make use of all four (culture, talent, skills and experience), rather than the traditional two.

If you had to do a proper test for these pieces, you could make the final decision as to how you would implement them: my suggestion being 25% for talent, 25% for culture and 50% for skills and experience – you decide what becomes more important in the right fit for your company.

By taking the traditional route, you could run into the risk that you employ someone who can do the work, but can’t communicate; or that can do the work, but doesn’t want to learn more; or who can communicate really well, but doesn’t want to do as much work.

You’re trying to find people with a natural ability to learn and adapt to new processes, that take on challenges and learn from them; what you’ll find is that talent and culture can’t really be taught, where skills and experience absolutely can.

More often than not, you can teach people the skills of the job that need to be done, but the ability to be a self-starter, to be autonomous, high-performing and to have a strong work ethic – are all things that can’t be taught; they either have it, or they don’t.

 

Honesty, Hunger, Humility, Happiness

 The email delivery powerhouse, SendGrid, applies a healthy combination of what they call the “4 H’s” when hiring new staff and it’s worked wonders for them.

There are 4 cards and each one is rated from 1-5 to measure where they fit in with those attributes in the company. It makes the hiring process a lot easier and you’ll find more emphasis put on talent and culture, rather than just skills and experience.

In the workplace, you should look at employees that bring, or have a sense of:

Happiness;

Hunger (enthusiasm);

Humility;

Honesty.

These are obviously not the be all and end all in measuring who should or should not be an employee, but it is a pretty good start.

 

The Rotting Banana In The Car 

A story that is etched into my brain, which gave me a nice chunk of insight into how skills and experience don’t necessarily correlate with values, talent or culture is the rotting banana story.

A few years back, I had a national key accounts manager that sat in on an interview with a potential employee that he considered hiring. The interview went well, I thought she had all of the necessary skills and experience for the job, so naturally thought that she’d be a great fit.

This is when it got interesting. Instead of simply thanking her, finishing the interview and letting her be on her way, he insisted that he walk her to her car.

I was expecting him to come back up to the office saying how brilliant she is and that we should pull the trigger and hire her. To my surprise, he said without hesitation, “we’re not hiring her.” I thought why not? She has the right talent, skills, a great network and ticked all of the proverbial boxes.

He said that I had to see the state of her car; that a black, rotting banana peel sat on the front seat and was just baking in the sun, probably emitting all sorts of foul odours. He was horrified at the state of her car and said that it meant she was disorganised, messy, can’t keep her head clear, that she doesn’t represent herself well in front of clients and that she’s put on a really good sales front for the interview and that deep down the car is a reflection of who she is.

I thought to myself, “that’s madness”, then he asked me if I saw her nails, which he pointed out were half-painted and half-worked. He firmly said, “she doesn’t take care of herself.” He pointed out that you want someone in sales that takes care of themselves, as they also represent you, or the company and judging by the state of her grooming and car, she’s not a good culture fit for the company.

This taught me the valuable lesson of always paying attention to how well potential employees take care of their car and of themselves. Sure, some people might have an off-day, but those small things can tell you a lot about a person and how they would fit in with your company.

Just in case you were wondering:

I keep myself well-groomed, healthy and fit and know how to best represent you and your business.

So if you’re in need of a great business coach, that also rocks up fresh and energetic – get in touch.

 

+2783 253 3339

brent@spillly.com

 

Shit! This just reminded me that I need to go get that damn banana out of my car.

The joke is on you, because I have a kickass motorbike, just so I can avoid bananas.

To Be, Or Not To Be A Family-Run Business

By Business Coaching Entrepreneur Strategy No Comments

Family is a beautiful and sometimes icky subject to approach when business is involved, as there are so many arguments for and against the involvement of family in forming any kind of business.

In my years of coaching a diverse variety of clients, I’ve found that a number of them run family-owned businesses and that there is a certain level of both ease and discomfort that come with making such an unpredictable choice.

As with everything in life, there’s always a lurking list of pros and cons that can be used to spark either healthy debate or ignite a scorching argument – so get your pitchforks and flamethrowers ready, as we take a look at some of them.

Is Blood Always Thicker Than Water? 

In breaking down the different arguments for and against having a family-run business, I often run into both plenty of benefits and detriments in the situations that my clients often come to face.

These family-owned businesses come in different shapes and sizes: a husband and wife partnering up to conceive a healthy, young startup; a father and son building towards a timeless legacy; sometimes 3rd generation families that start with the grandfather and trickle all the way down to the grandchildren, exist, as well.

There is a lot of conversation around how to run the dynamics of a family business and a lot of business owners will often run into the decision whether or not to include or employ family.

Usually in those family-oriented businesses, there’s a tendency to employ family members that are either unemployed, miserable in their current jobs, or that they could trust in building a great business that will last. Most of the time it’s done out of love, but sometimes because employing family can work out as a nice, cheap option.

Some of the biggest advantages of having a family-run business would be more empathy all the way through the company, as there is an extra level of care; you often know who or what you’re dealing with in an employee and understand the person better; the opportunity of a faster start-up, because you avoid the process of sifting through people that you don’t know, avoiding tedious interviews and background checks; and family tends to be a bit more united from the get-go, having more motivation to succeed with and for one another.

Take a look at some of the most powerful family-run businesses like Nike, Walmart and Samsung – they are amazing at what they do and provide a pretty solid defence around family involvement.

Get your fire extinguisher ready – because on the contrary, Harvard research has proven that family-run businesses have a success rate of around only 30%. A scary statistic that should be paid more attention to, as 70% of these businesses fail, get bought out, or never make it past the 2nd generation.

It’s not difficult to find arguments against having a family-run business, as it’s not always a peachy and pleasant road to go down.

You’ll find that those high levels of comfort ultimately slow down the company growth, with a reduced sense of drive and professionalism; conflicts don’t necessarily stay business-related, but can carry through into personal affairs; often blatant levels of unfairness on staff that aren’t considered family, as promotions and progress in the company become a contentious issue; deciding which family members deserve leadership roles and raises certainly push buttons; and often a lack of accountability follows if management doesn’t want family who are in the wrong left feeling butthurt.

It can often change family dynamics quite quickly, creating resentment and rifts that were never there before.

 

Blood and Business Can Be Like Oil And Water 

One of the saddest things that I come across in my experience coaching is the disjointing and disruption of families that can often be found in running a family business.

Quite often, married couples might partner-up in starting a business and pretty much all of their energy, time and efforts are spent on making that vision work in the best possible way. Waking up together, going to work together and all that is ever discussed is the business – creating an imbalance between their relationship and business-relationship.

As the proverb goes: “familiarity breeds contempt”.

All of that time spent on work and business, without enough focus on love, ends up eating away and destroying a marriage faster than a divorce lawyer with bills to pay. The power dynamics in family-business relationships often shift, too – the water gets murky and power becomes an issue between couples, parents, children and even grandchildren. It doesn’t always work out for the better when the kids take over the business, kick mommy and daddy to the curb and play with their budgets, while partying away the profits.

There’s a funny saying that’s echoed through time: “the grandfather started it, the father built it and the children spend all of the money.”

My stance is that if you don’t need to employ family or friends, simply don’t.

It’s not always worth the risk of burning bridges, creating rifts, starting fires and ruining the precious gem that is family. Love your family, take care of and respect them enough not to bring them into a potential and likely mess.

It’s impossible to go back in time and make your amends when the damage has already been done.

For more polarising and hard-hitting thoughts on your business decisions, tactics, ideas and plans:

Feel free to get in touch with a business coach that actually gives a shit, We can have a chat, grab a lunch, maybe a warm beverage, You know exactly how to reach me:

 

+2783 253 3339

brent@spillly.com

 

 

 

 

Innovation and disruption labs exposed.

By Business Business Management Coaching Innovation

At first Google ruined our perception of culture and set standards so ridiculously high that most business in South Africa doesn’t even attempt to fix their culture because the bar has been set so high. Now with their skunkwork’s “Solve for X” and the acquisition of Idealab Google have outsourced the smart thinking and can afford to hire the best minds in the world to help solve problems most of us don’t even know are problems yet. This should not stop even the smallest business from being innovative and disruptive in their immediate space. But what is Innovation and disruption besides the trendy terms that are thrown around and leadership conferences?

 

Its important to get your head around that fact that all disruptors are innovators, but not all innovators are disruptors. A disruptive technology or idea literraly changes the way we think, behave and buy and can influence countless people to experience something new in their lives. Innovation can do the same thing but more often than not, is incremental and has a smaller impact on the general populus but does simplify, speed up and improve something to justify the change.

 

The next imporant fact is that you are more than likely not going to be the ground breaking innovator in your industry and your opposition will be first to market. And thats perfectly okay. In Adam Grant’s book “Originals: How Non-Conformists Move the World” he beautifully explains how marketing researchers Peter Golder and Gerard Tellis compared the success of companies that were either pioneers or settlers.

 

The pioneers were first to market: the initial company to develop or sell a product. The settlers were slower to launch and waited until the pioneers had created a market before entering it. When Golder and Tellis analyzed hundreds of brands in three dozen different product categories, they found a staggering difference in failure rates: 47 percent for pioneers, compared with just 8 percent for settlers. Pioneers were about six times more likely to fail than settlers. Even when the pioneers did survive, they only captured an average of 10 percent of the market, compared with 28 percent for settlers. Feel better?

 

When you see disruptive innovations coming from outside your organization you have 3 options:

1.     Option 1: Chase the market

2.     Option 2: Find new markets based on your expertise

3.     Option 3: A non-productive approach, to deny that the disruptive innovation will affect you market at all and continue business as usual. Lets all bury our heads in the sand, shall we?

 

When you learn of a radical new invention that threatens to disrupt your business and market, do not ignore it and don’t “insulate” against these disruptive threats and try preserving your current business model. Don’t be afraid to educate the market if the move is happening especially if you are leading the charge.

 

So how should you bake innovation into your company?

 

At the pharmaceutical giant Merck, CEO Kenneth Frazier decided to motivate his executives to take a more active role in leading innovation and change. He asked them to do something radical: generate ideas that would put Merck out of business. His executives worked in groups, pretending to be one of Merck’s top competitors. His team developed ideas for drugs that would crush theirs and key markets they had missed. Then, their challenge was to reverse their roles and figure out how to defend against these threats as Merck.

 

This is referred to as a “Kill the company” exercise. Its super powerful as it reframes a gain-framed activity in terms of losses. When deliberating about innovation opportunities, the leaders weren’t inclined to take risks. When they considered how their competitors could put them out of business, they realized that it was a risk not to innovate. The urgency of innovation was apparent

Running an innovation lab or disruption session in your business is a great starting point. Start with some hard-hitting questions that address what actions might your competitors take tomorrow that would keep you awake at night. Other questions you can pose your team are as follows:

 

 

a.     What new technology could potentially destroy our business model?

b.    What new legislation/law could potentially destroy our business model?

c.     What’s happening in another part of the world that you could adopt and adapt in your environment?

d.    What are some of the disruptive changes in your industry that might serve as the source of innovation for you and your company?

e.    What are the key emerging technologies, and how are they being used inside and outside your industry, company, and region to create proprietary advantage?

f.      Is there new business models emerging that you can adopt or adapt to deliver radical improvements in the way you and others do business?

g.     Can you expand not just your “share of market” but also your “share of wallet” by adding new business models—for example, if you currently have a product business, can you add information, services, or solutions?

h.    Can you expand into adjacent businesses by either taking over activities that used to be done by someone else in your industry, expanding into new markets, or adding new products?

i.      Are there fragmented industries where significant value can be delivered through consolidation?

j.      Are there shifts in power with an entry or exit of a key player or consolidation of several players, which threaten your existing position or create opportunities to partner in your existing business or enter a new one?

k.     Are new markets or businesses emerging in other parts of the world that create opportunities or threats?

l.      Are there opportunities to create value by outsourcing or offshoring activities that you currently perform inside your organization?

m.   Is there activities that you currently source from outside that you should be doing inside to create proprietary advantage?

n.    Is there impending or shifts in regulation, political power, or society that threaten to disrupt entrenched power bases and provide opportunities for new entrants?

o.    Where is the greatest complexity now?

p.    What are the most “emotion-generating/engaging” service attributes you can offer that you could never satisfy?

 

It is never a bad idea to throw in a PEST or SWOT analysis into the mix to thicken out the risk elements. Always think of worst-case scenario first and work your way towards a winning strategy. Successful entrepreneurs are able to recognize patterns before an opportunity takes shape and search for ideas at the intersection of markets, industries, and emerging technologies. Look for business models that work well in one market and can be adapted and applied in another.

 

An innovation workshop is never the only step to creating disruption in your business or market place. The stages you should try including are:

 

a.    Problem identification (customer journeys for anywhere between 1 month and 1 year)

a.    Clarify and challenge the biases and business models in your firm and in your industry

b.    Analysis and research; always have facts and figures as the basis for decision-making.

a.    Listen to—and learn from—the market: Identify sources of significant problems that cannot be solved using today’s product and service offerings. Focus first on the problem—not the solution. Be sure that you don’t just listen to your current customers.

c.     Design thinking stages (internal and collaborative); this helps you discover new product ideas.

d.    Unpacking the designs into options, road maps and feasibility.

e.    The decision making process.

f.      Assessment of capability and resource gap analysis.

a.    Identify important global and local trends that signal potential revolutionary shifts in customer behaviour

g.     The case for a business plan with revenue and value potential.

h.    The narrative for staff and the market.

i.      Design and implementation (includes assigning all your required resources)

j.      Testing the ecosystem.

k.     Launch and iteration.

 

Labs like these should take place on a set agreed frequency and adding external people for a unique POV adds a rich layer of brains that doesn’t have the same industry bias’ that your people do and broaden your perspective.

 

Here are a few tips on Innovation ideas and disruption workshops that spark original ideas:

 

·      Run an innovation tournament.

o   Welcoming suggestions on any topic at any time, doesn’t capture the attention of busy people.

o   Innovation tournaments are highly efficient for collecting a large number of novel ideas and identifying the best ones.

o   Instead of a suggestion box, send a focused call for ideas to solve a particular problem or meet an untapped need.

o   Give employees three weeks to develop proposals, and then have them evaluate one another’s ideas, advancing the most original submissions to the next round.

o   The winners receive a budget, a team, and the relevant mentoring and sponsorship to make their ideas a reality.

·      Picture yourself as the enemy.

o   People often fail to generate new ideas due to a lack of urgency.

o   You can create urgency by implementing the “kill the company” exercise [Stolen from Lisa Bodell, CEO of Futurethink.]

o   Gather a group together and invite them to spend an hour brainstorming about how to put the organization out of business—or decimate its most popular product, service, or technology.

o   Then, hold a discussion about the most serious threats and how to convert them into opportunities to transition from defence to offense.

·      The Pitch:

o   Invite employees from different functions and levels to pitch ideas.

o   At DreamWorks Animation, even accountants and lawyers are encouraged and trained to present movie ideas.

o   This kind of creative engagement can add skill variety to work, making it more interesting for employees while increasing the organization’s access to new ideas.

o   Involving employees in pitching has another benefit: When they participate in generating ideas, they adopt a creative mind-set that leaves them less prone to false negatives, making them better judges of their colleagues’ ideas.

·      Hold an opposite day.

o   Since it’s often hard to find the time for people to consider original viewpoints, one of the smart practices is to have “opposite day” in the boardroom and at conferences.

o   Executives and staff divide into groups, and each chooses an assumption, belief, or area of knowledge that is widely taken for granted.

o   Each group asks, “When is the opposite true?” and then delivers a presentation on their ideas.

·      Word Banishment

o   Ban the words like, love, and hate.

o   At the non-profit DoSomething.org, CEO Nancy Lublin forbade employees from using the words like, love, and hate, because they make it too easy to give a visceral response without analysing it.

o   Employees aren’t allowed to say they prefer one Web page over another; they have to explain their reasoning with statements like “This page is stronger because the title is more readable than the other options.”

o   This motivates people to contribute new ideas rather than just rejecting existing ones.”

·      Welcome criticism.

o   It’s hard to encourage dissent if you don’t practice what you preach.

o   When you receive an email criticizing your performance in an important meeting, copying it to the entire company sends a clear message you welcome negative feedback.

o   By inviting employees to criticize you publicly, you can set the tone for people to communicate more openly even when their ideas are unpopular.

·      Shift from exit interviews to entry interviews.

o   Instead of waiting to ask for ideas until employees are on their way out the door, start seeking their insights when they first arrive.

o   By sitting down with new hires during onboarding, you can help them feel valued and gather novel suggestions along the way.

o   Ask what brought them in the door and what would keep them at the firm, and challenge them to think like culture detectives.

o   They can use their insider-outsider perspectives to investigate which practices belong in a museum and which should be kept, as well as potential inconsistencies between espoused and enacted values.

 

In summary, throwing innovation and disruption workshops may be seen as a cool new thing but they stand for ground zero in change for big business and can be leveraged to unlock creativity for youur business and for customers and their wider community. Build an innovation lab to make sure you do not underestimate the value it can deliver.

21 Signs You Should Invest In Business Coaching.

By Coaching Mentoring

Running your own business is hard. It’s lonely at the top. Often business owners just wish they had someone [who isnt a friend or spouse] to just give open, honest and objective advice on what they should do and not do next. That’s where business coaching plays a vital role in your organisation. If you aren’t even sure what business coaching is work out how many of these 21 points resonate with you?

  1. You can’t determine what’s really important on a daily basis and aren’t even focusing on the ones you feel are. You are unsure what to do next and even what sequence to follow.

  2. You aren’t seeing the blind spots and feel you need someone to clue you into things you don’t know exist

  3. There is no one that you are accountable to and feel that having to answer to someone will keep you on track.

  4. You say yes to every opportunity and aren’t chasing the most fruitful ones.

  5. There is no focus on your weaknesses and you aren’t developing your strengths further.

  6. Your company lacks a differentiating factor that will advance your growth quicker and separate you from the pack.

  7. Your team are looking for a strong leader with powerful techniques to improve their own skills and keep them motivated.

  8. The business is treading water and just not growing fast enough and not reaching the potential you knew was there when you started the company.

  9. On a daily basis you are not happy at your workplace and are making excuses to not engage with clients and staff. You are looking for clarity, joy and increased success.

  10. There is no objective soundboard in your life that you can bounce ideas and frustrations off.

  11. Decisions are being made with no confidence and you are tired of making these choices alone. You know that what you are doing has been done before and just want someone to show you how.

  12. There is still passion in the business but you are finding it impossible to articulate this to potential clients and often find that people don’t really understand what it is you do. You lack a clear message and a juicy desirable brand.

  13. The constant “No’s” have bruised your ego and confidence. Getting new business is harder than you thought and you are too exhausted to keep trying.

  14. Your income is a roller coaster with great months and terrible month back to back, making it impossible to plan for stability and giving your team a feeling of insecurity.

  15. You really want to make more money and don’t know why its taken this long and aren’t sure if its meant to be this hard. Questioning yourself has become almost a daily occurrence.

  16. Marketing and cold hard sales are not your friend, but you would like them to be.

  17. You have heard of this myth called “work-life balance” and are desperately looking for a little of this.

  18. Comparing your business to other businesses has become a pastime and opposition are always quicker off the mark than you are.

  19. Your version of success has become muddy and your goal dates have come and gone more than a few times.

  20. There are no set processes in the daily operations and you keep repeating yourself to your team and making the same mistakes over and over.

  21. You’re serving everyone but yourself and you want better clients and don’t even know what your ideal client looks like.

If you don’t know how to build a business and are looking for the “Ah-ha” moments that will make your company a great company and getting a job is not an option, then you are ready for a business coach. Invest in your business. Invest in you and receive incredible value and freedom.